Expanded program for National Youth Science Forum in 2016

Young scientists, engineers, mathematicians and technology practitioners of the future will benefit from a strengthened program under the National Youth Science Forum for 2016, which will include opportunities to hone their communication, entrepreneurial and critical thinking skills.

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(image) Geoff Burchfield

(image T8 Photography)

(image T8 Photography)

Sarah from WA - Rio Tinto support Indigenous students attending NYSF

(image Sarah Samsara)

This coming January, The National Youth Science Forum (NYSF 2016) will offer its participants a refreshed and expanded program that focuses on three central ideas: engaging with science, technology and engineering and maths – STEM in Action; understanding the role of STEM in Society; and preparing the next generation of STEM Professionals.

“We have redesigned the program to provide a more cohesive and streamlined experience,” says Chief Executive Officer, Dr Damien Pearce. “By focusing on these three strands, we will lead students through a set of activities, lectures and visits that aim to build an improved understanding of the role of science in our lives, and how studying STEM at a tertiary level can lead them in many different directions.”

In 2015, the NYSF welcomed Lockheed Martin Australia as a major funding partner. “Lockheed Martin is proud to be a major partner of the NYSF, which builds on our well-deserved reputation as an advocate for STEM in Australian and across the globe,” says Lockheed Martin Australia Chief Executive, Raydon Gates.

Lockheed Martin Australia - Chief Executive, Raydon Gates

Lockheed Martin Australia – Chief Executive, Raydon Gates

 

Lockheed Martin Australia NexGen Cyber Information and Technology (NCITE) Centre Canberra

Lockheed Martin Australia NexGen Cyber Information and Technology (NCITE) Centre Canberra

“Our support for NYSF builds on our mission to help solve the world’s most technically pressing challenges and to advance scientific endeavour for a safer world in the future, but also recognises that we must inspire the next generation to pursue STEM careers by showing today’s students how exciting and rewarding these jobs can be.”

For 2016, the NYSF student interest groups have been realigned to reflect the national research priorities adopted by the Australian government in April 2015 – food, soil and water, transport, cybersecurity, energy, resources, advanced manufacturing, environmental change, and health.

NYSF provides its participants with a wealth of information about university and other tertiary level study options, through access to world leading research laboratories, with an inside view of local facilities where research outcomes are translated into real life products and processes. They also have considerable opportunity to network with the researchers and industry people that they meet, as well as each other.

“The NYSF is basically the young people’s first professional networking opportunity,” says Dr Pearce. “They go home fired up and ready to tackle year 12 with renewed enthusiasm and vigour.”

The range of skills the STEM graduates of the future will need are expanding every day. Also included in the 12-day program are lectures and panel discussions on critical thinking, entrepreneurship, communication skills, and the importance of having the diversity of our community represented in STEM working environments.

“We have also managed to pack into the program an extra lab visit,” says Dr Pearce, “offering even more science to the students! And along with our long-standing and extremely supportive lab and site visit providers across the campus of The Australian National University, it is really exciting to welcome IBM here in Canberra, hosting some groups at their Linux Development Lab; the National Film and Sound Archive, which is able to provide a lab visit for a large group; there’s an expanded program at the University of Canberra; and a really exciting visit to Lockheed Martin Australia’s NextGen Cyber Innovation and Technology Centre.”

The two NYSF Science Dinners will both feature inspirational guest speakers. For Session A, Dr Nick Gales, the Director of the Australian Antarctic Division has agreed to address the students and other dinner guests about his rich and varied career working for one of Australia’s most iconic and unique organisations. At the Session C dinner, acclaimed author, academic, and oncologist, Dr Ranjana Srivastava, has generously agreed to share with the students and guests her experiences of life as a working scientist. Information about  the NYSF Science Dinners is available by emailing nysf@nysf.edu.au

Dr Nick Gales

Dr Nick Gales, Director,  Australian Antarctic Division

Dr Ranjana Srivastava

Dr Ranjana Srivastava, author, academic and oncologist

 

The NYSF acknowledges funding and support provided by

Lockheed Martin Australia

The Australian National University (host university)

Cochlear Foundation

CSIRO

CSL Ltd

Grains R&D Corporation

GSK

Monash University

Murray Darling Basin Authority

NSW Trade & Investment

The University of Melbourne

The University of New South Wales

The University of Queensland

The 2015 program’s lab visit and site tour hosts are acknowledged here: http://www.nysf.edu.au/about/contributors

Additional background

In 2014-15 the NYSF

  • Attracted more than 1200 applicants
  • 600 of these were assessed as suitable to attend the program
  • 400 places were available for students to attend
  • 60 panels of volunteers from 21 Rotary Districts across Australia selected students to attend
  • 135 lab visits and site tours were conducted in January
  • 23 Next Step visits were conducted in major partner centres during school holidays
  • 43% of our participants came from rural and regional areas of Australia, reflecting our national reach, facilitated by Rotary
  • 55% of our participants were female
  • NYSF’s established national networks allows it to reach Australian schools and their students

Information: Amanda Caldwell, 0410 148 173        28/10/2015

NYSF National Science Teachers’ Summer School 2016 continues the tradition

Operating for over ten years, in 2016, the NYSF’s National Science Teachers’ Summer School (NSTSS) will continue to deliver a high quality science learning and teaching experience for all participants.

NSTSS 2016 offers teachers from all over Australia with an opportunity to visit The Australian National University and

  • Engage with leading researchers about the latest developments in science, in a collaborative and respectful professional environment;
  • Learn about the latest teaching resources developed by some of Australia’s iconic science and technology agencies;
  • Network with like-minded peers and challenge each other in discussions about what works in teaching Australian students today, and why? and
  • Join 200 of Australia’s leading science students at the NYSF 2016 Session A Science Dinner, featuring guest speaker, Dr Nick Gales.

Dr Gales is Director of the Australian Antarctic Division, and will address our dinner guests – including participants in the NSTSS 2016 – about his fascinating career, starting off as a country vet, leading him to be head of one of Australia’s iconic science agencies.

Dr Nick Gales

Dr Nick Gales, Director, Australian Antarctic Division

Other highlights include:

  • Discussion led by Professor Shari Forbes, University of Technology Sydney about Interdisciplinary Science in Practice in the context of forensic decomposition chemistry and the first ‘body farm’ in the southern hemisphere;
  • Live video conference with Dr Rolf Landua CERN, to learn the latest developments at the Large Hadron Collider and all things particle physics;
  • Visit to Tidbinbilla Deep Space Centre – they might let you drive a telescope!
  • Keynote and subsequent discussion from Associate Professor Graham Hardy, University of South Australia, on interdisciplinary teaching and learning in STEM;
  • Tour of science teaching facilities at Melrose High School, led by Geoff McNamara, Winner of the 2014 Prime Minister’s Prize for Excellence in Science Teaching in Secondary Schools;
  • Briefing discussion: Science Policy and Science Curricula – Dr David Atkins, Branch Manager Curriculum and Students with Disability, ACT Department of Education and Training;
  • Panel discussion with representatives from Scientists and Mathematicians in Schools; the Australian College of Educators, and the Australian Academy of Science.

Dates:   Arrive Sunday 10 January and depart Saturday 16 January 2016.

To apply, further information is here.