Meagan Lowe, NYSF 2008 Alumna — Sea, Sand & Science

Meagan Lowe attended the NYSF in 2008 and has been busy ever since taking on exciting new science related adventures and challenges. In her own words…

 

“I am lucky to have already had many interesting and diverse experiences in my academic and early professional career. Attending the NYSF in 2008 certainly opened my eyes to the huge range of disciplines and opportunities in science, and it inspired me to seek them out for myself. But I’d be lying if I didn’t admit the best part was hanging out with other students from all over Australia, and generally having a great time!

Fighting bushfires in Victoria

Given my strong interest in the environmental sciences, I chose to study a Bachelor of Science (Honours) at the University of Melbourne, majoring in Geography and Ecology, while also completing a Diploma of Modern Languages (French). I specialised in Coastal Geomorphology in my fourth year, and completed an honours thesis investigating the stability of artificial beaches in Port Phillip Bay, Victoria.
Following my undergraduate studies I moved to Anglesea, on the southwest coast of Victoria, to work as an Environmental Planner for the Department of Environment and Primary Industries (now DELWP). This role involved processing Coastal Management Act consents for use and development of coastal Crown land, and providing advice to communities and land managers on coastal management issues. Alongside this work I gained my General Firefighter Accreditation, and responded to bushfires in the Alpine National Park, Grampians National Park, and planned burns along the Great Ocean Road.

Meagan carrying out beach surveying work

Feeling up for a new challenge, in late 2014 I moved to New Zealand to take up a role as Coastal Scientist for a small coastal science consulting company, Coastal Research Ltd. In this role I used a coastal hazard analysis framework to investigate the risk of drowning and injury at beaches around New Zealand, coupled with analysis of incident statistics, demographic data, and user resilience. This information was provided to territorial authorities and surf lifesaving organisations to guide use of current and future resources, such as recommended surf lifeguarding service lengths. This work enabled me to travel all over New Zealand, and even to Malaysia to present at the World Conference on Drowning Prevention in 2015.

However, I was always keen to return to the world of research, and I am now back in Australia in the second week of my PhD in Coastal Geomorphology, whilst also continuing to work part-time for Coastal Research Ltd. My PhD project will investigate the morphodynamics of low-lying reef islands in the western Pacific Ocean, and their vulnerability to erosion under future climate scenarios. I am excited for the challenge ahead, to grow my research skills, and to make a contribution to the wider body of geomorphological knowledge.

My best advice for NYSF participants and other young scientists is: be confident to choose your own path, not the one you think people expect of you, and don’t be afraid to change up your career. You’re young and intelligent, and you can only benefit from exposure to a wide range of people, ideas and experiences.”

While working in New Zealand

NYSF featured in Lockheed Martin Australia STEM dialogue in Canberra

Five NYSF alumni were honoured to be part of the Lockheed Martin Australia STEM dialogue hosted in Canberra last week. Lockheed Martin Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer Marillyn Hewson applauded the National Youth Science Forum’s (NYSF) efforts in encouraging thousands young Australians to pursue careers in the fields of science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM).

Ms Hewson underscored the importance of innovation and STEM skills to Australia’s future, noting this was the reason the aerospace and defense industry leader had made the three-year commitment to the National Youth Science Forum in 2015.

During the dialogue, recent NYSF alumni reflected on key moments in their lives that inspired their interest in pursuing STEM fields and how industry and government can inspire more young people to study STEM. In particular, the alumni talked about how the NYSF inspired them, by exposing them to tangible problems, introducing them to potential opportunities in STEM, and by showing how science is applied in a wide array of fields to improve the world.

In photo with Ms Hewson (centre), National Youth Science Forum Alumni (from left):              Ms Ashley Dunne, Ms Bella Mortimore, Ms Matilda Dowse, Mr Andrew George and Ms Kaliopi Notaras

Ashley Dunne, originally from Perth but now studying Engineering at The Australian National University (ANU), attended the NYSF in January 2013, and shared the impact of the program on her decision-making.

“On my return home after the NYSF I began applying for engineering degrees at interstate universities, something that I would never have had the confidence or skills to do previously.

“Since graduating from high school, the NYSF has continued to open doors for me. I have made contacts both in universities around Australia and in industry who have opened their doors at the very mention of the NYSF program. Even when I first moved to the ANU to begin my degree, I think I was far more prepared to start university that a vast majority of my cohort, because of the skills learned on the program.

Without attending the NYSF, I wouldn’t be at ANU, I wouldn’t be doing innovative research at a local hospital and I certainly would not be able to stand here this evening and speak to you. The NYSF program has given me this self-confidence and that is the most valuable thing I could have asked for.”

Matilda Dowse attended the NYSF in January 2016 and completed year 12 at Canberra College that same year. She has just begun a double degree of Engineering (R&D) and a Bachelor of International Security Studies. “The Lockheed Martin dinner was a fantastic opportunity to interact with some of the leading national and international innovators and policymakers in STEM. Being allowed to seriously discuss important issues in the future of STEM education and industry with leaders from our community gave me valuable, critical insight into my dream field, and what we can do to improve it.”

From the CEO

The National Youth Science Forum (NYSF) 2017 January Sessions are now behind us and the 400 Australian and international students who participated have returned home to commence their final year in high school, full of new knowledge, inspiration and friendships to carry them forward during this pivotal time in their lives.

Both Session A and C were extremely successful and a testament to the extensive dedication and support we received from so many people who support our programs.  In particular, I would like to thank our Chiefs of Staff, Meg Lowry (Session A) and Martin de Rooy (Session C), and our teams of student staff leaders, whose efforts were instrumental to the success of program this year.

I would also like to recognise contributions by the NYSF Corporate staff, our volunteer Rotary parents, aunts and uncles, members of Rotary Clubs across Australia, Burgmann College, The Australian National University (ANU), our communications and teacher program interns, our many distinguished guest speakers and particularly our lab visit hosts, who provided access to leading research and industrial facilities. I encourage you to read back through the NYSF Outlook site to learn about some of the highlights from session.

Finally, the NYSF program could not exist without the financial and logistical support of our Partners and Sponsors. I thank them for their contributions during January and their continued support of the organisation and its programs.

Running in conjunction with the year 12 program in January was the NYSF National Science Teachers Summer School (NSTSS) – aimed at supporting teachers and their commitment to STEM education in their local communities. A group of 40 teachers from around Australia participated in this long-running professional development program. Teachers were exposed to cutting edge science via lab visits, workshops, and lectures as well as engaging and networking with their peers.

Exciting times are ahead for the NYSF as we continue to develop and grow the organisation. In January, our Chair, Andrew Metcalfe AO, announced the addition of a third January session (Session B) for NYSF 2018 hosted at The University of Queensland (UQ), providing an extra 200 places – 600 students in total at the ANU and UQ.  This is made possible through funding from the National Innovation and Science Agenda (NISA). The extra places will give more students across Australia the opportunity to explore their study and career options in the STEM fields. This is evidence of the value of our year 12 program and its positive effect on students studying STEM subjects.

Although January is over, the NYSF engine room is still running hot with much planned for the remainder of 2017 and beyond. Applications for NSYF International Programs have opened with overwhelming interest.  March is looking busy – applications for NYSF 2018 will open on 1 March and will be accepted until 31 May. The Rotary District Chairs Conference will be held in Canberra, and our alumni will be out and about promoting STEM study and the NYSF at the World Science Festival in Brisbane. Our Next Step Programs for NYSF 2017 students will run throughout April to July in Melbourne, Brisbane and Sydney, with alumni events co-hosted by IP Australia. The Student Staff Leadership Program kicks off in July and another first for the NYSF is our exciting pilot program, STEM Explorer, which will run for the in Adelaide in July 2017.  The STEM Explorer Program is a collaborative initiative between the South Australian Department of Education (DED) and the NYSF, targeting science engagement for school students in years 7 and 8. We also acknowledge the seed funding we received to develop this program from the Department of Industry, Innovation and Science.

In other news, we also announced in January that Professor Tanya Monro, Deputy Vice-Chancellor, Research and Innovation at the University of South Australia, has taken on the role of NYSF Science Patron.  Professor Monro, a NYSF alumna (1990), was Chair of the NSSS Board from 2014-2016.  We are delighted that Professor Monro will continue her involvement with the organisation. We have also welcomed Professor Sally-Ann Poulsen and Loren Atkins to the NSSS Board. Professor Poulsen is also a NYSF alumna (1986) and will bring with her a wealth of knowledge and experience in industry and academica.  Loren Atkins (NYSF alumna 2005), the new NYSF alumni representative, holds a Bachelor of Law (Hons), and a Bachelor of Science in Geography and Environmental Science, and currently works for the World Bank as an Associate Counsel.

By now, our NYSF 2016 alumni will have made decisions about the next stage of their education.  Whatever field of study or institution you have decided upon I would like to wish you all the best for your future studies and hope that in some small way the NYSF has helped steer you on your path.

Dr Damien Pearce

CEO

A Newcastle Tea Ceremony

Students from the Newcastle area who recently returned from the National Youth Science Forum (NYSF) 2017 Year 12 Program in January, were treated to an afternoon tea hosted by The Lord Mayor of Newcastle, Cr Nuatali Nelmes.

The Lord Mayor congratulated local students on their achievements and selection to the NYSF program.


“It was my pleasure to host this special afternoon tea recognising the National Youth Science Forum and the number of local alumni who demonstrated the up and coming science, engineering and technology talent in Newcastle’s high schools.”

Also in attendance were Rotarians from local clubs, representatives from The University of Newcastle, local school principals and NYSF alumni, including NYSF 2013 alumnus, Phill Johnson, who was recently awarded Newcastle’s Young Citizen of the Year, and Newcastle City Councillor, Declan Clausen, who attended the NYSF in 2010. Cr Clausen knows first-hand the benefits students can gain from the NYSF program.

“As an alumnus of the NYSF, I know the value it plays in opening doors for young people across Australia in engineering, science and innovation.”

Callaghan College (Jesmond Campus) Student, Meheret Dagemawe, said the afternoon tea with the Lord Mayor was a memorable experience.

“Having the opportunity of meeting the Lord Mayor has allowed me to have an in-depth conversation of my future aspirations, in which Lord Mayor, Nuatali Nelmes, took great interest and provided invaluable insight about my choices.”

“The NYSF, although science related, has given me life skills that I could apply regardless of what path I choose to follow. The connections created through laughter and healthy debates with the brilliant minds of like-minded students is what I cherish most. I was also able to take away the most valuable lesson of networking with awe-inspiring scientists and speakers. Going to NYSF has allowed me to widen my career and further study options, it’s enabled me to be able to see different perspectives from a wide variety of people,” she said.

Cr Clausen noted that an additional 200 places will be available for next year’s program and encouraged local students to apply.

“As a region we have been very fortunate to have been so well represented at NYSF in the past, and I strongly encourage young Novocastrians in Year 11 to apply to attend NYSF in 2018,” Cr Clausen said.

Applications for 2018 open on 1 March. Full details at: www.nysf.edu.au

NYSF Updating Amgen Australia

In January, NYSF’s CEO, Dr Damien Pearce, and four NYSF alumni presented to the annual Amgen Australia kick-off event in Sydney.

The Amgen Foundation, the US biotech company’s philanthropic arm, had provided funding to the NYSF in 2016. The presentation was designed to inform the Australian-based staff about the NYSF activities, especially the flagship Year 12 program, and the benefits for the young Australians who attend.

The four alumni — Dr Peter Vella, Anneke Knol, Amanda Ling and Vehajana Janu — all spoke passionately about their NYSF experiences, offering a range of insights about what the Year 12 program covers, their individual experiences, the opportunities that arose from attending, and their subsequent career choices.

Dr Peter Vella, who attended the NYSF in 2003, is currently a postdoctoral researcher in the Structural Biology Division at the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden. Peter studied for his Bachelor of Science and PhD at The University of Queensland, graduating in 2012.

“My work involves discovering new drugs for antibiotic-resistant bugs – to put it simply! So I was really pleased I could participate in this briefing at Amgen. It is good to see private companies being involved in supporting the NYSF, as young people need to know that there are science careers outside of academia. Attending the event with Damien was very interesting. As well as sharing my own experience about the impact of the NYSF, various Amgen staff came to chat with me about their backgrounds, which covered a variety of roles including medical researchers, managers of medical and regulatory compliance.”

Anneke Knol (NYSF 2011) studied Advanced Science (Hons) at The Australian National University, and is currently a Technology Graduate at Westpac Group. “Having the opportunity to talk directly to people in business about the NYSF and its impact was very powerful, and we were very well received by the people at Amgen. Many of them had studied science in the past and were quite passionate about its importance. It was also an opportunity to share stories about the value of a science degree more broadly.”

The NYSF is grateful to Amgen for this opportunity to engage directly with their staff to illustrate the benefits of the Year 12 program and acknowledge the support provided through the Amgen Foundation.

Dr Katie Owens, NYSF 2004 Alumna — A Global Career

Dr Katie Owens attended the NYSF in 2004 and has gone on to have a career in Pharmaceutical research that has taken her around the world.

“Attending the NYSF in Canberra was an incredible experience that I will never forget. I was so inspired by the scientists, Rotarians and other students that were involved in the programme. The NYSF truly motivated me to pursue a career in research. I was also fortunate enough go on the Russian Scientific Study Tour hosted by the All-Russian Youth Aerospace Society as part of the international program, and returned to the NYSF in 2005 as a student staff member.

I count myself very fortunate to work in a dynamic research field with an excellent team of scientists and health professionals. Attending the NYSF played a signficant part in motivating me to pursue an exciting career in science research.

“After finishing high school in Maroochydore, Queensland, I enrolled as a Health Sciences first year student at the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand. At the end of the year I was accepted into the School of Pharmacy. While studying a Bachelor of Pharmacy, I became interested in research and was able to undertake two summer research studentships during my degree. I thoroughly enjoyed studying at Otago. In my opinion the student lifestyle in Dunedin is second to none. After graduating in 2008, I completed the Pharmaceutical Society of New Zealand EVOLVE Internship Programme in a community pharmacy in Dunedin.

“In 2010, I received a School of Pharmacy Departmental Award Postgraduate Scholarship at the University of Otago. My PhD project was in the area of clinical pharmacology in patient populations. I also worked part-time as a community pharmacist and undergraduate tutor. I presented my PhD research at several conferences during my PhD (in New Zealand, Australia, Singapore and Italy).

“After submitting my thesis in 2013, I moved to Paris, France to start a postdoc in the Division of Clinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacometrics at the Institut de Recherches Internationales Servier. My project involved developing pharmacometric models of drug response in lymphoma patients, which further developed my skill set and gave me valuable experience in the pharmaceutical industry. On a personal note, it allowed my husband and I to live in Paris, learn French and travel.

The DIDB Program Team at the ISSX Conference, Orlando — Florida (Katie left)

“Since 2015, I have been working as a Research Scientist at the Drug Interaction Database (DIDB) Programme in the Department of Pharmaceutics at the University of Washington in Seattle, USA. The DIDB is an online knowledgebase that is currently used by a large number of pharmaceutical companies, regulatory agencies, contract research organizations and academic institutions worldwide. My role is to manually curate pre‑clinical and clinical drug interaction studies from scientific publications and documentation from the US Food and Drug Administration.

“I count myself very fortunate to work in a dynamic research field with an excellent team of scientists and health professionals. Attending the NYSF played a signficant part in motivating me to pursue an exciting career in science research.”

Carl Pinson, NYSF 2002 Alumnus — A Passionate Science Teacher

Written by Carl Pinson.

In 2001, I was contemplating becoming an Osteopath; I liked the idea of healing using manipulation of the body. Then I achieved a place in the 2002 intake of NYSF. The entire two weeks was amazingly memorable. I met some fascinating characters and enjoyed learning more about the study and application of science. Highlights included visiting the telescope at Mt Stromlo (the big one was still operating until bushfires in 2003), watching people research with lasers at ANU, and participating in a number of thought-provoking discussions and debates.

After that, I was confident that I needed to study something to do with science. I applied for and was granted a NSW Department of Education and Training scholarship to study a Bachelor of Science / Bachelor of Teaching at Newcastle University — this degree offers more than twice the minimum amount of practical teaching, and you’re learning about education all through your degree. I was offered casual work in 2006 before I even graduated, and then was appointed to Chatham High School in Taree.

Working as a teacher is constantly challenging and exciting. I am a people person, so interacting with other like-minded professionals as well as helping inspire and shape young minds is a real positive for me.

Carl (second right) on an excursion at laser tag with his students

Working as a teacher is constantly challenging and exciting. I am a people person, so interacting with other like-minded professionals as well as helping to inspire and shape young minds is a real positive for me. The best teaching experiences I’ve had include coaching the winning team in the 2007 National Solar Boat Regatta at Penrith, going on water bug surveys with Mid Coast Water personnel, and participating in the University of Newcastle Science and Engineering Challenge. I also accompanied students to ANU with Professor Murray Batchelor as part of a Scientists in Schools program through CSIRO. Getting the students out of the classroom helps to show them the relevance of science to their everyday life and also makes teaching much more fun!

I have just finished three years teaching on Norfolk Island, a remote island 1600km from Australia and actually closer to New Zealand! It was a job advertised through the NSW Department of Education and involved a very significant lifestyle change. Activities included scuba-diving, snorkelling on an impressive coral reef, participating in conservation projects and meeting a whole range of wonderful people including the local Flora and Fauna Society. I also urged one of my students to attend the NYSF, which he did at the beginning of 2016. I have enjoyed the opportunities provided in education, and recommend it to suitable people with a lot of patience.

Carl Pinson’s students from Chatham High at the 2007 Solar Boat Regatta

Carl Pinson (right)

Let’s Hear it for the Communications Interns at NYSF 2017!

Every year, the NYSF offers places for alumni to return as volunteer Communications Interns. The role is fairly wide-ranging – to attend various program activities, and report on what occurs during the NYSF, filing stories for the NYSF Outlook blog.

Our NYSF 2017 interns provided an overview of their experience in January:

Jackson Nexhip

Returning to the NYSF triggered some strange emotions; something akin to returning home.

On the surface it seemed as though it should have been an entirely different experience; I was a few years older, I was in Canberra this time rather than Perth, and was returning somewhat as staff rather than student. But despite the differences, the NYSF spirit was alive and well.

You learn so much at the NYSF that you can almost feel your mind expanding. Just like in 2013, the presentations and institution visits were of an extremely high calibre – it was humbling and inspiring to be so out of my depth in so many different fields.

The intellectual side was great, but I think the best part was the opportunity to hang around with and get to know the NYSF 2017 students. I think that as the years go on you lose sense of the impact the NYSF can have, and having the chance to chat and get to know the students brought back all kinds of nostalgia.

I really admired the energy, curiosity, and sheer determination of some of the students, and it left me feeling somewhat inspired to go and do bigger things in my own life. It’s a huge privilege to meet these young scientists and future leaders, and I look forward to seeing them do all kinds of crazy things as the years roll on.

The media intern position is a sweet gig, and I’d highly recommend it for any students with an interest in writing and/or science communication (I don’t think I need mention the longing to return to the NYSF). The media team are very supportive, you’ll have a lot of fun, and you’ll learn a lot.

Daniel Lawson

“Writing about the NYSF experience was an amazing opportunity and I’d definitely recommend it to any NYSF alumni interested in science communication and science education. Most of all, attending the NYSF 2017 as a communications intern confirmed my confidence in the future of Australian science. To see 200 young scientists build lifelong friendships reminded me of my own session, and I realised that although the names and faces had changed, the students’ attitudes and passion for science had remained just as strong.

Being a communications intern also gave me a unique perspective on the NYSF, as I was able to chat with students and academics about their interests and goals in science, I was also able to observe how being there changed the students. When you attend the NYSF, the experiences and moments you share with 200 other passionate science students changes you. Personally, I didn’t realise this until my local Rotary club of Murgon mentioned how much more confident I was after attending the NYSF. It was an amazing opportunity to be able to witness these transformations in students at the NYSF 2017 as they grew into (more) confident young scientists.

Megan Stegeman

The NYSF science communications internship was an amazing two weeks. Being back at the NYSF was exciting enough, but witnessing how it is organised, and the amazing work that went on behind the scenes, gave a real appreciation for my own session.

My own NYSF experience meant that I understood and knew what to expect in the program, which I think is an advantage when trying to work in such an exciting and (as all alumni remember) unique environment. The work was fun, going to lab sessions and lectures and writing them up, and the environment was supportive and friendly. I was encouraged to take lots of photos, and especially to develop my own style of writing, which I’m sure is not common across all internships.

Watching the participants learn new things, and witnessing some of them in their first professional labs was rewarding in itself. I saw students in a pathology lab use the mechanical pipette for the first time, and it occurred to me that that participant could go on to be a great scientist, and it was here that they got their first lessons.

I would recommend this internship to anyone and everyone, I think it’s an amazing opportunity, that I hope others will realise and take advantage of as well.

Veronica O’Mara

Coming back to the NYSF as a Communications Intern in January 2017 was a wonderful experience. It was incredibly useful hearing similar things to what I heard three years ago but without the HSC looming over my head. Coming back reaffirmed my decision to study science and major in genetics and molecular biology and made me much more sure of my choices and of myself.

My favourite event on session was the Science Dinner with Professor Emma Johnston’s address. It was incredibly encouraging as a woman studying in STEM and definitely demonstrated to me that many people such as Professor Johnston who have achieved incredible things and are doing so well in their chosen field still have doubted their ability in themselves. I think this was definitely something that also resonated with the participants, leaving them with an important message, “To believe in those who believe in you,” when you are doubting yourself.

Being an NYSF Communications Intern provided us with a unique opportunity to experience the NYSF again as well as to gain some valuable skills in science communication. It was wonderful to be given a lot of freedom in our writing styles and what and how we wanted to record the session.

It gave me a chance to develop my communication skills which is extremely important in any career in STEM. Without good communication skills, there is little point in research. You have to be able to effectively communicate your ideas to others in an accessible way.

My experience at the NYSF this year has definitely shown me that studying a science degree was the right path and reaffirmed my goal of completing a PhD in medical research, but has also opened up more possibilities in science communication and outreach.

If you are an NYSF alumni and would like to register your interest in returning to the NYSF in 2018, where there will be six positions on offer, email communications@nysf.edu.au

Awards & Recognition: NYSF Alumni in the News

Here at the NYSF we love to see all of our NYSF Alumni following their passion in their studies, careers and communities. It’s also fantastic when they are formally recognised for their hard work and over the past months a number of NYSF Alumni have been recognised with formal awards and scholarships.

Simon McKenzie (NYSF Alumnus 2010), who is currently completing his PhD with the ANU in the field of computational chemistry, has received a Westpac Future Leaders Scholarship aimed at supporting exceptional students pursuing post-graduate study. The scholarship includes a nine-month leadership development program as well as an international experience for up to six months.

Jasmine Elliot — NYSF 2017 Alumna

Several former NYSF participants have received Young Citizen of the Year awards in their respective regions. Jasmine Elliot, who completed the program this January, has been named Young Citizen of the Year by the Gladstone Regional Council at the Australia Day awards ceremony on the 25th of January. Jasmine is involved in several groups including the Gladstone Region Youth Council and the Headspace Youth Reference Group. She is also nominated for another award in the Access Community Services and Multicultural Youth Queensland Cultural Diversity Awards which will be announced on May 5th.

Within his own region, Phillip Johnson (NYSF Alumnus 2013) was named Young Citizen of the Year by the Newcastle City Council. This is thanks to his advocacy for students on a range of different issues. Phil currently attends the University of Newcastle, studying Civil Engineering, where he has taken on the role of Student Association President.

Katie Rae (NYSF Alumna 2014), who is an active member of the Toowoomba Guiding Community, has also been honoured with the Young Citizen of the Year award within her own region. And in the region of Cowra, it was Maddison Johnson (NYSF Alumna 2016) who took out the same award owing to her representation of Cowra at several local, state and international events. Maddison has been an active Youth Council member for the past 3 years, was lucky enough to be chosen as one of just six Australians to attend the United Nations Global Youth Leadership Forum held in the United States and was the Lions Youth of the Year and Youth Peace Ambassador in 2016.

Olivia Flower — NYSF 2016 Alumna

Ben Kenworthy (NYSF Alumnus 2016) is one of 14 year 12 students featured in an ABC TV documentary, My Year 12 Life. The program follows the 14 students through their year 12 at high school via a video diary. Insightful and informative, you can catch it through the various ABC TV platforms.

Olivia Flower (NYSF Alumna 2016 and student staff leader 2017) was awarded the Ken Ward Memorial Scholarship in herhome community of Freshwater in Sydney’s northern suburbs. The scholarship goes towards her university costs and recognises Olivia’s academic achievement, leadership, community service, charitable and voluntary work, and sporting prowess.

We would like to congratulate all of these alumni for their outstanding achievements.

Ecolinc Victoria’s Emerging STEM for Women — Speed-Daters Needed

The Ecolinc Science and Technology Centre is running another Emerging STEM for Women event on Wednesday 14 June, at their centre in Bacchus Marsh in Melbourne.

The event is already fully booked with ca 90 year 9 and 10 students coming to hear about a range of study and employment opportunities in STEM. A key element of the day is the speed-date event, which runs from 1-2pm. You will meet with a small group of students for about 10 minutes at a time, talking about your study and work experiences before the group rotates off to the “next speed-dater”.

The key-note speaker on this occasion is Colleen Filippa, one of two Victorian women who are involved in the Homeward Bound expedition to Antarctica. Homeward Bound is a women’s leadership and climate change research project, in which NYSF alumna Sandra Kerbler is also a participant.

Several NYSF alumna helped out at the Ecolinc event in October last year. Ideally, you will have  tertiary study and work experiences to share.

Ecolinc director Linda Flynn says, “The success of the day is attributed to the many women who are prepared to share their stories with these girls and we truly appreciate the volunteers’ time on the day.  In appreciation, we always provide a yummy lunch prior to the ‘speed dating’ session!”

If you can help out as a speed-dater on 14 June, please contact Linda at ecolinc@edumail.vic.gov.au, and let her know you are an NYSF alumna!