Join the ANU Open Day Lab Coat Party

ANU Open Day – Saturday 26 August

Join us at ANU Open Day on Saturday 26 August and get a taste of life as an ANU science student. We will be offering a range of fun and interactive activities to help you determine your scientific future. Check out some of the activities below:

Lab Coat Party

Pick up your free lab coat and come along to our Lab Coat Party. You’ll get the chance to see our multi-million dollar facilities while trying out some hands-on experiments including visualising sound and robot programming. You may even make some new friends! Register here for your free lab coat.

STEM Avenue

If you’re looking for more, check out STEM Avenue. We’ll be serving up everything Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM). Grab a bite to eat, dance to coded music and see some thrilling science and engineering demonstrations.

Meet a scientist

Meet our leading scientific minds (did we mention our Vice Chancellor is a Nobel Laureate in Physics?). Our academics will be available all day to discuss their passion for science and the study options available to you.

Read more about ANU Open Day

Monash – What’s happening at Monash University

Monash Open Day

What a fantastic day we had!  Plenty of hands-on demonstrations, informative talks and explosions. If you missed out – there’s another opportunity to visit us, just book a tour of the Science precinct during the upcoming school holidays at https://www.monash.edu/science/about/events.

In the meantime, please take a moment to watch some of the highlights from this year.

 

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How to Survive on Mars: The Science Behind the Human Exploration of Mars

Could you survive on Mars? Mars has always captivated the human imagination, and it’s the most explored planet in the solar system. Getting to Mars is relatively easy – but surviving once you get there is the real challenge. In this four-week course, you’ll learn the basic science to help you solve the problems Martian explorers will face around water, oxygen, food, energy and communications. The course is open to all students and will be particularly relevant for students interested in science, engineering and technology.

Course commences 7 August.

Monash short, online courses are offered for free through the FutureLearn platform. For more information and to register, visit https://www.futurelearn.com/partners/monash-university

UQ News – What’s on at the University of Queensland

Careers in Cloud Computing

Date – Thursday 31 August 2017

Time – 2.45 – 4.30pm

Location – The Playhouse, Women’s College, University of Queensland, St Lucia

Hear an address by Teresa Carlson, Vice President of Amazon Web Services,on the future of technology and the many high-demand careers now available  in cloud computing. If you are interested in attending, see your school Guidance Counsellor/Officer. RSVP through your school to school.liaison@uq.edu.au by Friday 25 August 2017.

 

QLD Science Contest

Registrations close 9 October

The 64th Queensland Science Contest is a great opportunity for students from Prep to Year 12 to have their scientific work judged and receive over $12,000 in awards and prizes. Registrations for student entries will be open until 9 October. Judging is on Saturday 14th October.

The University of Queensland supports the prestigious “Young Scientist of the Year” Award.  For information, contact: staq@staq.qld.edu.au

 

UQ St Lucia campus tours

Tours are a great way to become familiar with the campus. If you take your tour between 6 March – 30 October 2017 you can go into the draw to win a GoPro HERO5 Black, a Red Balloon Voucher and a UQ shirt, with a total  value of $800. To book a guided tour, visit UQ’s Future Students website.

Scholarships

Looking for Scholarships for 2018? Check out the range of scholarships at UQ. Visit https://scholarships.uq.edu.au/

 

What’s happening at Melbourne? News and Updates from Parkville

VTAC APPLICATIONS NOW OPEN

The VTAC timely course application period is now open for Year 12 students who are thinking of applying for a Tertiary Education place in 2018, closing on Friday September 28, 2017.

The University of Melbourne offers through its Melbourne Model, the opportunity to create your own study path in over 41 different areas of Science through our Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Biomedical Science degrees like in areas such as Biology, Chemistry, Animal Health and Disease Management, Physics and Physiology.

Learn more about how our Melbourne Model will immerse you in a different way of thinking here!

 

CAUGHT! THE CELL BEHIND A LUNG CANCER

For four years straight, medical researcher Clare Weeden would go on alert whenever lung surgery was underway anywhere across Melbourne. No matter the time, she would have to be ready in her lab to receive samples of fresh tissue as part of a project to isolate and research the stem cells that repair our lungs as they constantly breathe in contaminants from air pollution to cigarette smoke.

Basal stem cells are very quick at repairing DNA damage caused by inhaled chemicals such as those from cigarette smoke, but they are prone to making mistakes. It means that the more repair work they have to do, the greater the chance of a cancer-causing mutation.

“It isn’t definitive but the evidence is that lung basal stem cells are the likely cells of origin.” Claire says.

Find out more about this amazing research here!

 

CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE AGE OF TRUMP

Just as it seemed the world was starting to make serious efforts towards halting climate change, the United States – a country always considered essential to an effective international response – has elected a leader openly hostile towards climate science and climate action and who is already acting on that hostility.

What does the election of President Trump mean for worldwide attempts to limit warming to well below two degrees Celsius? Where can we find hope? What can Australians, particularly the intelligentsia, learn from his election and the local and international responses to his efforts to unravel US action on climate change? How can and should we respond?

Join us at Melbourne for this free lecture as part of the University’s lecture series ‘The Wednesday Lectures 2017: The Intelligentsia in The Age of Trump’ on Wednesday 30 August in our Public Lecture Theatre, Old Arts Building in Parkville.

Book your spot at our lecture series here!

 

BRUSH YOUR TEETH… IT COULD SAVE YOUR LIFE

Next time you’re racing out of the house without cleaning your teeth, think again. Neglecting your pearly whites can lead to a lot more than the odd filling.

It’s the simplest of actions, but brushing your teeth properly with a good fluoride toothpaste that produces plenty of white froth could save your life. Gum disease is extremely common. One in three adults and more than 50 per cent of Australians over the age of 65 have moderate to severe periodontitis, which is caused by an imbalance of bacteria in the mouth.

Led by University of Melbourne researchers, a global network of experts is working to improve the situation and potentially improve the health of millions of people.

“A lot of people just think they clean their teeth,” Professor Reynolds says. “But you actually have to clean the gum margin – it’s absolutely critical – and in between your teeth. Periodontitis starts in the gaps in between your teeth and around the gum. People are so focussed on tooth decay that they scrub the biting surfaces, which does nothing for periodontal disease.

“You should not only do your gums, in soft circular motions, you should clean the … top layer of your tongue as far back as you can go with the tooth brush and the tooth paste. Scrub it, froth it up. Because it’s that froth, the suds, that gets the biofilm … that harbours the bacteria.”

Read more about this announcement here!

NYSF STEM Explorer roams across the Adelaide landscape

The first National Youth Science Forum (NYSF) STEM Explorer Program was delivered successfully in July, and what a week it was! Running from 17-21 July in Adelaide, the Program was the first residential STEM camp in Australia for year 7-8 students. Feedback from the students, site visit providers and all involved has been overwhelmingly positive allowing a strong base to build for next year’s program.

The NYSF STEM Explorer Program was delivered as a partnership by the NYSF and South Australian Department of Education and Child Development (DECD).  Championed by the NYSF’s Science Patron, Professor Tanya Monro from the University of South Australia, and supported by the Hon Susan Close MP, Minister for Education and Child Development and also for Higher Education, the STEM Explorer Program was designed to stimulate students’ interest in the study of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

“The STEM Explorer Program is an ideal opportunity for our students to explore STEM on a deeper level and network with other students and experts who share similar interests and levels of passion in these subjects. There’s an identified need for more STEM graduates in the state, and NYSF have worked hard to tailor their specialist pilot program to profile a host of opportunities,” said Ms Close.

Picture: The Hon Susan Close MP speaking to the participants about the value of STEM.

Professor Tanya Monro believes STEM skills are critical to keep Australia moving as an innovative country. “STEM literacy is simply a core capability that Australian employers need. As an education provider, NYSF is proud to offer a new program which aims to attract new students to STEM and equip them with the necessary skills and knowledge to succeed.”

Picture: Professor Tanya Monro, NYSF Science Patron, getting to know the students in the Monro interest group.

A huge thank you to all of our supporters, who generously offered their time and resources to host the students and share with them their own science endeavours, research and passion for STEM:

  • The University of South Australia
  • The University of Adelaide – including the Why Waite program
  • Flinders University
  • the South Australian Museum
  • SciWorld
  • the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI)
  • the South Australian Research and Development Institute (SARDI)
  • the South Australian Aquatic Sciences Centre (SAASC) and the
  • NRM Education – a program of the Adelaide and Mount Lofty Ranges Natural Resources Management Board.
  • Finally, a big thanks to Mylor Adventure Camp for being excellent and supportive hosts!

Most importantly we owe thanks to our funding partners SA DECD and the National Innovation and Science Agenda (NISA).

Read about the NYSF STEM Explorer Program highlights here.

NYSF Rotary District Chair, Stephen Lovison talks about student selections

Rotary, NYSF,

“I honestly had no idea the depth and breadth of the program”

From our larger cities to small regional towns in outback Australia, Rotarians have been super busy over the past few months promoting the National Youth Science Forum (NYSF) and conducting student selections for the NYSF 2018 Year 12 Program.

We spoke to NYSF Rotary District Chair (DC), Stephen Lovison from Sydney (D9675), about his involvement with Rotary and the NYSF Student Selection process.

Stephen first joined Rotary in 1999 as a Rotaractor and has been president of his Rotary Club, Como-Jannali, twice and served on numerous district boards.

“(I joined Rotary) primarily to give back to my local community and to assist overseas causes championed by Rotary International.  I like the fact that club members are local community leaders, but the beneficiaries of our volunteer work could be anywhere on the planet,” Stephen said.

“When the opportunity for NYSF District Chair became available I decided to try something different. I honestly had no idea the depth and breadth of the program until I got working on it – it’s been challenging and rewarding all the same.”

Rotary Liaison Officer on the NYSF Board, Rob Woolley, estimated that last year Rotarians volunteered more than 20,000 hours to the NYSF in promoting the program and conducting student selections.  Rotary has over 30,000 members, 1,100 clubs in 21 Districts throughout Australia, giving students from all corners of the country the opportunity to attend the NYSF.

“Rotary provides a massive logistic service when it comes to student identification, interview and selection. We rely on our network of business and community leaders to ensure the most suitable candidates are put forward (to district selection),” Stephen said.

This year the NYSF Year 12 Program will be expanding, allowing 600 students to attend in either Canberra or Brisbane.  Stephen added that the program provided a great opportunity for students who were interested in the STEM fields of study.

“Experience and exposure to the top minds and resources in STEM at the level NYSF provides is unrivalled. If you can get access to this as a young person and springboard your career in STEM because of this opportunity, go for it.”

Rotary, NYSF

This year the NYSF is offering 40 Equity Scholarships of $1000 each to students who may need assistance to attend the Year 12 Program.  Stephen believes this will encourage a more diverse range of students to apply.

“There are a number of schools and districts where, for various reasons, a program such as this may be deemed “out of reach”.  In keeping with Rotary and NYSF’s commitment to making the program viable to all students, the Equity Scholarship should hopefully open more doors for these students.”

And Stephen’s advice to students thinking of applying to the NYSF …

“Jump on the NYSF website and do some research, then make contact with your local Rotary Club. We are here to guide you through the process and answer any questions you may have.”

“In our district, we look for any student with a keen interest in the STEM fields, who is community and culturally open minded, and is willing to share and collaborate with their peers and mentors.”

Stephen said feedback from students who have participated in the NYSF Year 12 Program is a testament to its success and value.

“We have not had anything but praise for the NYSF team and the program itself from every returning student! The phrases “changed my life” “wonderful and challenging two weeks” “would recommend to anyone” feature heavily in the post-program reports sent to DCs.”

“In broad terms, alumni have gone on to various university courses and careers in science, healthcare, astronomy, and engineering. Several have joined Rotaract and/or Rotary and we’re glad to see that investment coming full circle.”

For more information about the NYSF Year 12 Program go to https://www.nysf.edu.au

ANU Event – Girls in Engineering and Technology Program (GET Set)

The ANU has the following event on offer to young women interested in engineering and technology with registrations now open.

Girls in Engineering and Technology Program (GET Set) is designed for female students in years 11 and 12, who wish to explore an education and career in engineering or technology.

This year The Australian National University (ANU) is celebrating the 10th GET Set event with a very special program of activities. This free, fun-filled day of non-competitive activities includes design, test and build tasks, lectures, demonstrations and more.

To find out more and register, visit the ANU College of Engineering and Computer Science website.

Date: Wednesday 19 July 2017

Time: 8.30am-4pm

Location: Ian Ross Building 31, The Australian National University

 

What’s happening at Melbourne University?

What’s happening at Melbourne? News and Updates from Parkville

As written by the University of Melbourne

FOCUS ON MELBOURNE – COURSE INFORMATION EVENINGS

Our Focus on Agriculture, Biomedicine, Engineering, I.T, Science and Veterinary Science information evenings are a great way to learn more about our Biomedicine and Science undergraduate degrees and career pathways. The event will feature a range of different presentations, Q&A panels and opportunities to meet with our current staff and students.

  • Talk to our friendly staff about your study options in 2018
  • Hear from current students and staff about, and get a glimpse of University life
  • Explore majors, breadth options, electives, internships and research opportunities in your chosen faculty

Focus on Biomedicine – Tuesday 16 May
Focus on Agriculture – Thursday 18 May
Focus on Veterinary Science – Thursday 18 May
Focus on Engineering -Tuesday 23 May
Focus on I.T – Wednesday 24 May
Focus on Science – Tuesday 30 May

To learn more and register, visit the Focus on Melbourne website: https://futurestudents.unimelb.edu.au/explore/events/victoria_and_interstate/victoria/focus-on-melbourne

SHARKS – HOW A CULL CAN RUIN AN ECOSYSTEM

Killing of sharks in high numbers can devastate oceanic ecosystems, leading to plummeting populations and serious environmental consequences. Associate Professor Robert Day, a marine biologist in the School of BioSciences at the University of Melbourne, says sharks’ role is so tightly interwoven with the health of the ocean, if their numbers are reduced everything goes out of balance.

“The top predators in any ecosystem are very important because they decide on whether other creatures become numerous or not,” he says.

“If there is a lack of sharks, then fish and other ocean creatures that would otherwise be consumed by sharks will become too numerous and eat too many smaller creatures and so on, meaning that the whole ecosystem changes massively.”

Find out more about this amazing research here!

PLANTS HAVE FEELINGS TOO!

Plants may not have eyes, ears or a tongue, but their skin can perform many of the same functions. Plants are not only aware of when it rains or when it’s windy, but they can respond accordingly.

Dr Kim Johnson, a research fellow in the School of BioSciences, University of Melbourne, studies the world of plant senses.

“Plants are constantly under environmental stresses. You can actually see how plants respond to those physical stresses because they change their shape,” Dr Kim Johnson says.

“So if a plant is getting constantly hit with strong wind, it will actually change shape to better resist that wind; if roots hit a rock, they’ll grow around it, so they sense things around them.”

Find out more about this amazing research here!

FROM POKEMON GO TO THE CLASS ROOM – HOW THE UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE AND MICROSOFT IS TAKING STUDENTS UNDER THE SKINS OF THEIR PATIENTS

Pokémon Go pushed Augmented Reality, or AR, into the mainstream, sending over 500 million people chasing cartoons with their smartphones. But now, in a unique multi-disciplinary collaboration, it’s making the leap from entertainment to education.

A new fusion of augmented reality, gaming technology, and anatomy is giving physiotherapy students at the University of Melbourne access to cutting-edge technology to take a look inside the human body by projecting different layers of muscles and bones over the top of a volunteer ‘patient’. It provides an inside view of how the body works as it moves in real time.

By using tracking sensors mounted on a scaffold it projects images of our muscles and skeleton directly onto a volunteer. The images automatically follow the shape and movement of the body, giving students in the studio space an interactive all-round view of how our bodies work. It can even allow them and their teachers to “draw” on the projected image to make information and action more explicit.

Find out more about this amazing research here!

An update from the University of Queensland

There is much happening at the University of Queensland – Here is an overview of recent and upcoming events.

UQ St Lucia campus tours
This is a great way to become familiar with the campus. If you take your tour between 6 March – 30 October 2017 you can go into the draw to win a GoPro HERO5 Black, a Red Balloon Voucher and a UQ shirt, at a total value of $800.
To book a guided tour, visit UQ’s Future Students website.

Big Day In
8 June 2017
UQ is hosting the Big Day In on 8 June in the AEB Auditorium at our St Lucia campus. Join us to hear leading speakers from companies such as Microsoft, Adobe, Technology One, WiseTech Global, Tata Consultancy Services plus loads more. Tickets are $10 for students.  Book now.

Scinema

8 June 2017
SCINEMA is a celebration of the power of the moving image to tell stories about the world, how it works, and our place in it. There are hundreds of science stories to be told on screen. Festival screenings will take place across Australia, with the Brisbane screening at the Palace Barracks Cinema at Petrie Terrace. Book your tickets online.

Experience Science 2017
Register as: An individual student – individual students may register to attend on Friday 7 July.
Experience Science is a free event that provides students in years 10 – 12 the opportunity to discover what studying science is like at UQ and how science is applied in industry and everyday life. The event is facilitated by experts from UQ and industry through a series of hands-on, interactive science workshops.

Visit UQ at TSXPO
16 – 17 July 2016
The Tertiary Studies Expo is on again at the RNA Showgrounds. More than 250 representatives from universities and industry will be present and admission is FREE. Drop in and speak to UQ staff about programs, study options and exchange opportunities.


Register now for UQ Earth and Environment Day
21 July 2017 – Register as an individual.
Come and experience the applications and relevance of
geography, planning, earth sciences and environmental management, and find out about career with real world impact. For more information, visit UQ Earth and Environment Day.

 

See UQ up close  –  UQ Open Days
7th August – St Lucia Campus & 21st August – Gatton Campus
UQ Open Day is your chance to get a feel for what it’s like to be a UQ student. At our Open Day you
can speak with staff, take a campus tour and attend information sessions about studying and life at UQ.

AYAF Brisbane
3 – 7 July 2017
The Australian Youth Aerospace Forum (AYAF) is a five-day residential conference on campus at UQ which provides students in years 11 and 12 the opportunity to investigate careers and pathways in the aerospace industry. The forum showcases university and industry opportunities available to students upon completion of secondary school. Applications close Friday 26 May 2017.

 

Spinifex and snakes: women in STEM applauded
Two University of Queensland researchers have won the Queensland Women in STEM competition in recognition of their work paving the way for young women to enter science careers.

 

SPARQ-ed
June-November 2017
The SPARQ-ed Program is a unique initiative of the Translational Research Institute (TRI), the UQ Diamantina Institute (UQDI) and Queensland’s Department of Education and Training (DET) proudly bringing together quality researchers to engage with keen science students and their teachers throughout Queensland.
Spaces are still available in many programs for years 10-12.

 

 

News from Monash University

Monash University has invested more than $200 million in the last few years to transform the Clayton-based Science Faculty into one of the leading science precincts in the southern hemisphere.

Spanning the disciplines of Physics and Astronomy, Biology, Chemistry, Earth Atmosphere and Environment, and Mathematics, the Science Precinct at Monash University has recently been transformed into a research powerhouse and provides state-of-the-art research, teaching and learning environments.

From the new Chemistry laboratories to the science student only lounge, the spaces provide an excellent on-campus experience. Monash’s approach to teaching is ground breaking and includes world-class and unique outdoor classrooms such as the Earth Sciences Garden and the Jock Marshal Reserve facility.

The new 360 virtual reality video offers the opportunity to experience these facilities.

To see this please visit http://www.monash.edu/monash-science-precinct

(Note mobile users: best results please view in the YouTube App.)