ANU graduates rated Australia’s most employable

ANU graduates have been rated the nation’s most employable (for the 5th year in a row!). ANU students get a well-rounded education that employers are looking for. They learn from the world’s leading minds and they get the chance to do fieldwork, internships and global travel.

ANU graduates have been ranked Australia’s most employable graduates and are among the most sought after employees worldwide. The latest Global Employability University ranking, published by the Times Higher Education, rated ANU as Australia’s top university for getting a job for the fifth consecutive year.

ANU is a world-leading university in Australia’s capital city, Canberra, a world-leading centre for research, education and policy engagement. ANU counts more Nobel Laureates among staff and alumni than any other Australian university (including our Vice Chancellor!).

At ANU, you’ll get a world class qualification and an educational experience to help you stand out in the jobs market, here and overseas. Our students get internship experience in places like the Australian Parliament, the Australian Academy of Science, CSIRO and Geoscience Australia (to name a few). ANU have a global outlook in which we strongly encourage students to seek international experiences as part of their education and develop leadership skills, it’s our students that make us among the top most employable universities in the world.

For further information on what makes ANU graduates so employable, click here.

What’s happening at the University of Melbourne? News and Updates from Parkville

COURSE INFORMATION DAY

Course Information Day is a great opportunity to hear first-hand what STEM related opportunities exist at the University of Melbourne. The event will run on Monday 18 December, where you can ask questions about our Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics courses and have a tour of our campus and residential colleges.

The University of Melbourne offers through its Melbourne Model, the opportunity to create your own study path in over 41 different areas of Science through our Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Biomedical Science degrees like in areas such as Biology, Chemistry, Animal Health and Disease Management, Physics and Physiology.

Register to attend our Course Information Day here!

THRIVING AMID THE RISE OF THE MACHINES

Since 1948, futurists have warned about the impact automation could have on the human workforce, and now those changes are becoming a reality. Does it mean a re-think about what jobs humans can do better than machines?

Technology is destroying jobs, says Dr Greg Adamson, an expert in the social impact of advanced technology. There can no longer be any doubt about that hard fact of life in the 21st Century. The process is now inevitable, as automation, robotics and artificial intelligence embeds deeper into our society.

But with robots and automation proliferating – and with traditional jobs disappearing – what opportunities are there for humans in this new age?

WHY CAN’T WE CURE CANCER?

After heart disease, cancer is the second leading cause of death in the world – 8.8 million people lost their lives to cancer in 2015.

A generation ago, one in three people in the developed world were diagnosed with cancer; in some countries it is now approaching one in two. Low- and middle-income countries are also severely affected – with the majority of cancer cases now presenting themselves in these countries.

Why despite the great strides in medical knowledge, does the world continue to struggle in finding a cure for cancer? This episode of The PolicyShop addresses this question with two world leading experts.

Nobel Laureate, Dr Harold Varmus, currently the Lewis Thomas University Professor at Weill Cornell Medical College, who formally served as the Director of the National Institute of Health and as the Director of the National Cancer Institute in the United States and Associate Professor Sherene Loi, head of the Translational Breast Cancer Genomics Laboratory at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in Melbourne join the host Professor Glyn Davis, Vice-Chancellor of the University of Melbourne.

You can find the podcast on iTunes or listen on our website, here!

ETHICS IN SCIENCE EVENT

With the rapid advancement of science, ethical dilemmas arise frequently. These range from the use of embryonic stem cells or animals in research, deciding how much power to give robots and artificial intelligence, how far to go with clinical trials in humans or using modern technology to decide whether one should turn off the life support of someone in coma.

Though science is not infallible, it is essential that scientific research is pursued with integrity and transparency and to the highest possible standards. Scientists owe this dedication and honesty to their pursuit of truth and to the tax-payer who both funds and is the beneficiary of the research.

At this forum, five internationally renowned scientists working in different fields will address some of these ethical issues and answer questions from the floor.

This Q&A type session will be moderated by Bernie Hobbs from the ABC (The New Inventors).

Register to attend our Ethics in Science forum here!

WHAT COULD SUSTAINABLE AUSTRALIAN CITIES LOOK LIKE IN 2040?

It’s 2040.

As you wake and look outside, things might not look hugely different to 2017 – there aren’t any hoverboards or sky highways – but Australian cities have managed to cut their greenhouse gas emissions by 80 per cent.

And how your day unfolds will look very different depending on how we reached this point.

How can Australia meet its cities energy needs whilst also meeting the country’s clean energy targets?

Read more about this article here!

What’s on at The University of Queensland

 

OP Advice Night – December 18th


OP Results Advice Night is the perfect opportunity to discuss study options at UQ after you receive your OP.  Learn more about entry requirements and get personalised advice on pathways into your ideal program. Take a tour of the St Lucia campus or attend one of the many seminars presented by UQ staff.

View the seminar schedule  https://future-students.uq.edu.au/op-results-advice-night

UQ Create Change Masterclasses

UQ is now offering a series of online learning opportunities: Create Change Masterclasses.
These engaging and interactive classes complement the Federal Government National Innovation and Science Agenda, which highlights the need for new ideas in innovation, and new sources of growth to deliver the next age of economic prosperity for Australia.

The first three classes in the series each take around an hour to complete:

Careers that started in science

Ann Damien, Bachelor of Biotechnology

“I first became interested in science when I attended the National Youth Science Forum while I was in high school. That was the first time I really saw people who were genuinely excited about science! I was hooked.

UQ’s international ranking and reputation for world-acclaimed researchers in life sciences along with excellent campus facilities placed UQ at the top of my preference list.

I now work as a New Technology Associate in the Asia-Pacific New Technologies Team (ANTT) at Cook Medical.

Biotech is an amazing field to be a part of,  the opportunities for new technologies and development are almost unlimited.”

Read more at career-profiles.science.uq.edu.au/ann-damien

How to lead in a disrupted world
This TEDxYouth talk (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kEnnBEfKvLU) is presented by Bernie Woodcroft, Director of ilab, a Start-up Accelerator owned by the University of Queensland.
He talks about the current and likely future changes in the world of work and the skills needed to be successful.

Monash University – Dingley at the International Astronautical Congress (IAC)

From Monday 25th to Friday 29th September, Adelaide saw cosmonauts from Russia, science educators from America, space entrepreneurs from New Zealand, and a geeky kid from Perth come together to experience the 2017 International Astronautical Congress (IAC). It was truly one of the most inspiring events I’ve been to and the best thing I’ve seen Australia do since I attended the National Youth Science Forum (NYSF).

The congress was open to anyone who wanted to come, and had a nice 90% discount for Australian students which I was more than happy to take advantage of. Other students from places such as America or France were sponsored by their universities to attend. Many gave presentations at the Congress but I was just there to enjoy the show!

When the foundation of the Australian Space Agency was announced at the IAC’s opening ceremony I, along with the 3000 other attendees, was ecstatic. For me this became the theme of the Congress and I made sure to talk with as many people as possible (including some of the people actually designing the thing!) about what it might mean.

Mornings were spent trying to rapidly consume Weetbix in order to make it to the first 7AM presentations. Here we heard from Lockheed Martin about their “Deep Space Gateway” which would act as a stepping stone between Earth and the solar system; plans for a Moon Village made up of a patchwork of colonists; and discussions about creating a space congress … in space.

I spent most of the day attending technical sessions, where researchers discussed their work and the audience asked questions and provided advice or perspectives. One of my university lecturers gave a talk on how lunar dust behaves in zero gravity and the problems that this causes. In between these sessions I walked around the exhibition hall where private companies and government agencies would show off their latest tech. I was super excited to try out Boeing’s new to-scale simulated capsule as well as having a chance to talk to space entrepreneurs (some of who even agreed to be interviewed for the video I was working on – see link at end of article).

The afternoon and evening talks was where ‘space celebrities’ took the stage. Bill Nye told us about the Planetary Society’s Light Sail which would make chemical rockets obsolete; and Elon Musk concluded the conference with an update on his BFR (Big Falcon Rocket) which he wants to use to take crews of 100 to Mars in 2024 and revolutionise air travel with 30-minute flights to anywhere in the world. Both speakers were amazing to listen to and hear about their vision.

Attending the IAC was an amazing experience, giving me an opportunity to talk to students and professionals from across Australia and around the world. I’ve made some great friends whom I look forward to exploring the final frontier with.

I made two videos while there; one on Australia’s history in space  (https://youtu.be/Lh0HepsdyqQ) and the other on where we’re headed (https://youtu.be/Xp52XCY97D4). If you’ve got any questions about my experiences or where we’re headed in space I’m very happy to discuss in the comment section of either video!

You can also like the Atomic Frontier Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/atomicfrontier/

Generation Beyond — Lockheed Martin’s STEM Program on Display at Avalon Airshow, Victoria

The first person to visit Mars is in school today. Will it be you?

In an Australian first, NYSF’s major partner Lockheed Martin is bringing its Generation Beyond STEM display to the Avalon Airshow in Victoria next month.

Generation Beyond is an educational program designed to inspire the next generation of innovators, explorers, inventors and pioneers to pursue STEM careers.

With a number of fun and interesting interactive displays, Generation Beyond will take visitors on a journey from today, into the future and beyond and will feature the F-35, the Orion spacecraft and Mars exploration.

Generation Beyond will be open to the public on the weekend of March 4 and 5 at Avalon.

NYSF 2017 visits Canberra firm Seeing Machines

Seeing Machines is a company started out of a robotics lab at ANU. The company develops technology which tracks the movement of eyes. This has a series of applications in the mining, automotive, aviation and medical industries. During the visit, the participants were able to try the ‘fovio’ system which is used in mining vehicles to detect drivers’ micro sleeps and when they need to stop and have a break. If a driver was to fall asleep loud noises and vibrations would wake him/her and alert supervisors.

Trying out the system

In addition to learning about the company and the technology they develop, the participants had the opportunity to hear from nine of their employees and their own journey through science. This was a unique opportunity to see where particular degrees could take the participants in the future but at the same time revealed that the skills a STEM degree gives you can be applicable in a wide range of areas.

revealed that the skills a STEM degree gives you can be applicable in a wide range of areas

The participants heard from software engineers, mechanical engineers and research scientists. One theme that was common throughout the presentations was the importance of having the right attitude, mastering maths, and the need to “always be learning, your whole career” (Seeing Machines software engineer, Andrew Medlin).

Kate Robinson, a NYSF 2017 partcipant said that she, “found it really interesting seeing how the different engineers went from one place to another and how they have been able to travel with their jobs, not just staying in Australia but travelling overseas. The lab was interesting being in the workplace, seeing how everyone works together and what they do on a day to day basis”.

The participants really enjoyed the opportunity to talk to the engineers and discover what path could lie ahead for them.

Veronica O’Mara, NYSF 2017 Session C Communications Intern and NYSF 2014 alumnus.

 

NYSF 2017 Session A: Partners’ Day Expo

After the Partners’ Day presentations the students gathered for the Partners’ Day Expo , where they were able to meet, chat and network with representatives of the NYSF partners.

The students were able to meet reps (and the presenters) from Lockheed Martin, IP Australia, UNSW Australia, Monash University, Melbourne University, Australian National University, University of Queensland, CSIRO, CSL, Resmed, and Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC).

The one-on-one conversations with the representatives proved to be valuable for the students – they got their questions answered and expanded their horizons in terms of career choices and opportunities.

All of the students were obsessively engaged in conversation that evening, but I managed to pull two aside for a quick chat about their thoughts on the expo.

“It encourages people to think and create change, and I’m a big advocate for creating change.”

“IP Australia really stood out for me” said Sharon Nguyen. “People are coming up with new ideas all the time, and so the work that they do at IP Australia is important because they can protect it. It encourages people to think and create change, and I’m a big advocate for creating change.”

“Before NYSF I wanted to do occupational therapy, then through talking to NYSF friends and the presenters I realized there was a whole world of opportunity and options out there that I hadn’t thought of.”

Sharon Nguyen with Matt Lee (Assistant Director of Strategic Communication, IP Australia)

As well as career choices, the conversation with the university reps in particular also illuminated life as a tertiary student. It seems as though it not only helped inform the students, but also sparked some excitement.

“Talking to all the presenters and other professionals has got me really excited to start university and the next stage of my career.”

“[Partners’ Day] made me realise how many options are out there, and it got me thinking about and considering many different universities” said Danyon Farrell.

“I’ve always wanted to do a double degree but I wasn’t sure, but after hearing the talks today it really made it obvious how valuable they are and the opportunity that they open.”

“Talking to all the presenters and other professionals has got me really excited to start university and the next stage of my career.”

One happy Danyon Farrell

By Jackson Nexhip, NYSF 2017 Session A Communications Intern and NYSF 2013 Alumnus

Thanks to NYSF 2017 funding partners

NYSF Funding Partner organisations are pivotal to the successful delivery of each year’s program. Their financial support allows the NYSF to continue to deliver a quality program of activities for NYSF’s student participants.

Funding partners participate in the NYSF at each session’s Partners’ Day program. Presentations about each organisation are made to the students, and an Expo Display session held in the afternoon allows the students to speak one on one to the Partners’ representatives.

The NYSF is very grateful for our partners’ support and acknowledges the effort and resources that go into their contributions to the program.

A full list and links to the NYSF partners is here.

From the Chief Executive Officer

As we head into the last few weeks of 2016, here at the NYSF we are ramping up for our January Sessions – NYSF 2017. All of the student participants have been selected for the two programs held at The Australian National University, the first of which begins on 2 January. So there’s no real break for our corporate team and the brilliant student staff leaders, who have been training throughout the year for the task ahead.

Our sincere thanks to our Rotary colleagues across the country for their support and hard work in selecting and supporting our participants in their attendance at the NYSF. The Rotary Orientation sessions have been across the country in September and October, providing an opportunity for this year’s cohort to get together pre-session and for them and their families to learn more about the NYSF and what they can expect when they arrive in Canberra.

So what can they expect? This year, our Programs Team has been planning for six science tours and visits for each participant, in their interest group – over the two sessions, that amounts to about 180 tours provided by our program supporters at the various institutions and businesses in the region, including the ANU, the University of Canberra, the CSIRO, and the Canberra Institute of Technology just to name a few. As well as those tours and visits, the participants will go to lectures given by leading Australian scientists, hear about future study options from our university partners, and the possible career paths they might consider from our business partners. At the Australian Academy of Science, they will learn about its role and resources, as well as the history of the iconic building – The Shine Dome. And at the Science Dinner, held this year at the National Museum of Australia, our guest speakers will captivate with insights on their research activities and their impacts, and their own careers in science. Our popular Alumni Lectures will be open to the wider NYSF community this January, featuring two former NYSF/National Science Summer School (NSSS) participants whose stories and experiences are excellent illustrations of the variety of opportunities available from further study and careers in STEM.

Last week, we launched the NYSF 2017, program following the announcement from the Minister for Industry, Innovation and Science, the Hon Greg Hunt MP, that the NYSF will receive $600,000 over four years through the National Science Innovation Agenda (NISA).  The funds are allocated for three specific activities – the expansion to a third NYSF program to be run in January in a second location; the support and expansion of the National Science Teachers Summer School; and the establishment of an Equity Fund that will encourage the participation of young people from more diverse backgrounds in the NYSF January Sessions.

The NYSF Chair, Andrew Metcalfe AO, welcomed the funding from the NISA program, saying, “These additional NYSF initiatives are important platforms in our engagement strategy to increase the understanding of the Australian community about the possible options for young people in STEM study and careers.”

Our involvement in the PwC 21st Century Minds program this year has been rewarding on many levels – the expanded networks, the skills development, and most importantly, the support from our Canberra PwC mentor team to complete our business plan, have been the key benefits. We look forward to the final program workshops in November, and to continuing to engage with the wider STEM outreach network as well as local and national PwC stakeholders into the future. PwC should be congratulated for its vision and leadership in raising the profile of investment in STEM for the future of the Australian economy, and perhaps more importantly, our community.

Finally, last week we also welcomed new funding partner IP Australia for the NSYF 2017 January program. Patricia Kelly, Director General of IP Australia, emphasised the benefits that the new partnership will bring for NYSF students and the wider Australian community.

“IP Australia is pleased to partner with NYSF to further support innovation and commercialisation, both fundamental to the role we play in the Australian community,” she said. (Read more)

I thank all of our funding partners – including major partner, Lockheed Martin Australia – whose support, both financial and strategic, means that the NYSF is able to continue to offer transformative STEM experiences for young Australians to encourage life-long learning.

We are all looking forward to January 2017 and the delivery of another program jam-packed with interesting, engaging and inspiring activities for the 400 young people who are attending, to  show them just what is possible with a career in STEM.

Dr Damien Pearce

Chief Executive Officer

NYSF welcomes IP Australia as new funding partner

The National Youth Science Forum (NYSF) is pleased to announce that IP Australia will be a new funding partner supporting the NYSF and its activities from the NYSF 2017 January Sessions.

Andrew Metcalfe AO, Chair of the NYSF Board, welcomed the new partnership, saying support from organisations such as IP Australia is essential if the NYSF is to continue to provide students with high quality programs in the STEM education environment.

“Partnerships with organisations such as IP Australia are crucial for the NYSF’s ability to offer extension activities that encourage our leading young science students to continue their studies on to university and ultimately into careers,” he said.

“It’s clear that an organisation such as IP Australia would have an interest in reaching out to the participants of our program – our future scientists and technologists – to both educate about the importance of intellectual property (IP) management, and to promote their organisation as a possible future employer. We appreciate and acknowledge their funding, as we do all of our funding supporters.”

Patricia Kelly, Director General of IP Australia, emphasises the benefits the new partnership will bring for NYSF students and the wider Australian community.

“IP Australia is pleased to partner with NYSF to further support innovation and commercialisation, both fundamental to the role we play in the Australian community,” she said.

“As part of the NYSF 2017 program, students will gain an understanding of how to protect their intellectual property (IP) and recognise the value registered IP rights add to the overall economy.”

“NYSF students are ambitious young Australians who are positioned to be the next generation of leading innovators. We recognise their talents and through this partnership we encourage them to pursue their passion for science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM).”

“Supporting new talent will result in a strong positive impact in securing Australia’s future as a global leader in science and technology”.

 

About the NYSF program:

This January, 400 students entering year 12, who have a passion for science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) subjects will arrive in Canberra for the NYSF 2017 January Sessions. Throughout the month, over two separate sessions, participants will live on campus at our host university, The Australian National University (ANU), visit local facilities, take part in science tours and activities, listen to fascinating lectures and talks from leading Australian researchers, take part in debates and speed-date events with our funding partners, and have fun at a range of social activities – all designed to facilitate the development of their first professional networks.

From Albany to Ararat, from Broken Hill to Bundaberg , the participants in the NYSF 2017 will arrive in Canberra keen to learn about possible tertiary study options, and the potential for future careers that arise from those study choices. And they will go home, ready to embark on their final year of secondary schooling, with renewed enthusiasm.

Over its thirty-year history the NYSF has a proven track record in providing our future scientists, engineers, technology practitioners and mathematicians a program that offers insights and opportunities to discuss the variety of study and career options available to them in STEM fields.

Current NYSF funding partners are listed here: http://www.nysf.edu.au/partners

 

Additional background

In 2015-16 the NYSF

  • Attracted approximately 1200 applicants
  • More than 600 were assessed as suitable to attend the program
  • 400 places were available for students to attend
  • 60 panels of volunteers from 21 Rotary Districts across Australia selected students to attend
  • 196 science visits and site tours were conducted in January 2016
  • 23 Next Step visits were conducted in major partner centres during school holidays in 2016
  • 43% of our NYSF 2016 participants came from rural and regional areas of Australia, reflecting our national reach, facilitated by Rotary
  • 59% of our NYSF 2016 participants were female
  • NYSF’s established national networks allows it to reach Australian schools and their students

 

 

Further information:  Amanda Caldwell, NYSF 0410 148 173