What’s happening at Melbourne University?

What’s happening at Melbourne? News and Updates from Parkville

As written by the University of Melbourne

FOCUS ON MELBOURNE – COURSE INFORMATION EVENINGS

Our Focus on Agriculture, Biomedicine, Engineering, I.T, Science and Veterinary Science information evenings are a great way to learn more about our Biomedicine and Science undergraduate degrees and career pathways. The event will feature a range of different presentations, Q&A panels and opportunities to meet with our current staff and students.

  • Talk to our friendly staff about your study options in 2018
  • Hear from current students and staff about, and get a glimpse of University life
  • Explore majors, breadth options, electives, internships and research opportunities in your chosen faculty

Focus on Biomedicine – Tuesday 16 May
Focus on Agriculture – Thursday 18 May
Focus on Veterinary Science – Thursday 18 May
Focus on Engineering -Tuesday 23 May
Focus on I.T – Wednesday 24 May
Focus on Science – Tuesday 30 May

To learn more and register, visit the Focus on Melbourne website: https://futurestudents.unimelb.edu.au/explore/events/victoria_and_interstate/victoria/focus-on-melbourne

SHARKS – HOW A CULL CAN RUIN AN ECOSYSTEM

Killing of sharks in high numbers can devastate oceanic ecosystems, leading to plummeting populations and serious environmental consequences. Associate Professor Robert Day, a marine biologist in the School of BioSciences at the University of Melbourne, says sharks’ role is so tightly interwoven with the health of the ocean, if their numbers are reduced everything goes out of balance.

“The top predators in any ecosystem are very important because they decide on whether other creatures become numerous or not,” he says.

“If there is a lack of sharks, then fish and other ocean creatures that would otherwise be consumed by sharks will become too numerous and eat too many smaller creatures and so on, meaning that the whole ecosystem changes massively.”

Find out more about this amazing research here!

PLANTS HAVE FEELINGS TOO!

Plants may not have eyes, ears or a tongue, but their skin can perform many of the same functions. Plants are not only aware of when it rains or when it’s windy, but they can respond accordingly.

Dr Kim Johnson, a research fellow in the School of BioSciences, University of Melbourne, studies the world of plant senses.

“Plants are constantly under environmental stresses. You can actually see how plants respond to those physical stresses because they change their shape,” Dr Kim Johnson says.

“So if a plant is getting constantly hit with strong wind, it will actually change shape to better resist that wind; if roots hit a rock, they’ll grow around it, so they sense things around them.”

Find out more about this amazing research here!

FROM POKEMON GO TO THE CLASS ROOM – HOW THE UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE AND MICROSOFT IS TAKING STUDENTS UNDER THE SKINS OF THEIR PATIENTS

Pokémon Go pushed Augmented Reality, or AR, into the mainstream, sending over 500 million people chasing cartoons with their smartphones. But now, in a unique multi-disciplinary collaboration, it’s making the leap from entertainment to education.

A new fusion of augmented reality, gaming technology, and anatomy is giving physiotherapy students at the University of Melbourne access to cutting-edge technology to take a look inside the human body by projecting different layers of muscles and bones over the top of a volunteer ‘patient’. It provides an inside view of how the body works as it moves in real time.

By using tracking sensors mounted on a scaffold it projects images of our muscles and skeleton directly onto a volunteer. The images automatically follow the shape and movement of the body, giving students in the studio space an interactive all-round view of how our bodies work. It can even allow them and their teachers to “draw” on the projected image to make information and action more explicit.

Find out more about this amazing research here!

News from Monash University

Monash University has invested more than $200 million in the last few years to transform the Clayton-based Science Faculty into one of the leading science precincts in the southern hemisphere.

Spanning the disciplines of Physics and Astronomy, Biology, Chemistry, Earth Atmosphere and Environment, and Mathematics, the Science Precinct at Monash University has recently been transformed into a research powerhouse and provides state-of-the-art research, teaching and learning environments.

From the new Chemistry laboratories to the science student only lounge, the spaces provide an excellent on-campus experience. Monash’s approach to teaching is ground breaking and includes world-class and unique outdoor classrooms such as the Earth Sciences Garden and the Jock Marshal Reserve facility.

The new 360 virtual reality video offers the opportunity to experience these facilities.

To see this please visit http://www.monash.edu/monash-science-precinct

(Note mobile users: best results please view in the YouTube App.)

Why should the kids have all the fun? Summer school for science teachers

For the fifth year, the National Science Teachers Summer School will be running in Canberra next January, coinciding with the National Youth Science Forum (NYSF).

Applications open:   Wednesday 24 September 2013

Applications close:   Friday 24 October 2013

Aiming to provide teachers of science with a chance to reignite their passion and enthusiasm for science and teaching, the NSTSS takes participants into research labs at the Australian National University (ANU) and other sites around the nation’s capital including the Mount Stromlo Observatory and CSIRO.

“We’re able to offer the teachers unique experiences in science and science education,” says Damien Pearce, NYSF Director.  “They take part in workshops, and have discussions about teaching, learning and assessment in the classroom. We also look at the range of tools available to enhance teaching practices.”

The teachers also interact with students taking part in the January Sessions of the NYSF, and attend the NYSF Science Dinner at Parliament House.

Professor Ian Young, Vice Chancellor of Australian National University at the 2013 NYSF Science Dinner

Professor Ian Young, Vice Chancellor of Australian National University at the 2013 NYSF Science Dinner

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NSTSS is made possible through the collaboration of the Australian Science Teachers Association (ASTA), ANU, and NYSF.  “This collaboration is allowing Australian teachers of science with a really valuable professional development experience,” says Vic Dobos, CEO of ASTA.  “The support we receive from the researchers who host the lab visits makes a big different to the understanding and engagement of the participants.”

  • “Dr Kirk seamlessly brought to life the complexities of research, funding and science. There are many ways in which this can be brought to the classroom from planning a unit around a relevant theme and weaving the facts into a bigger story through to using simple everyday objects to represent the models we teach. The opportunity to listen to a great science communicator and be inspired by them was priceless.”  Dr Paula Mills, Prince Alfred College, Kent Town, SA
  • “These world-recognised academic speakers were exceptionally approachable and showed a sincere willingness to help teachers with questions and points of clarification. Many also invited post Summer School contact. This offer to remain in touch was most impressive.”  Paolo Arman, St Aloysius College, Adelaide, SA
  •  “As a primary teacher focusing on science and extension I now feel more confident in advising fellow staff as to how they might teach science and how I can support them to improve student outcomes.”  Neil Bramsen, Mt Ousley Public School, NSW
  • “Attending sessions with the students from the NYSF was an absolute privilege. I learned so much from them. Seeing them and listening to them makes what we all do so worthwhile. I think sometimes we forget this”.   Karen Jared, Mt Gambier High School, SA

NSTSS 2013 Chemistry lab res1 NSTSS 2013 Mt Stromlo res 1

Successful applicants to NSTSS will receive economy airfares to and from Canberra, six nights’ accommodation on campus at ANU, all excursion travel and most meals. A registration fee of $500 + GST is sought, which is fully tax deductible.

Key dates for NSTSS 2014:

Applications open:                                                                 Wednesday 24 September 2013

Applications close:                                                                Friday 24 October 2013

Successful applicants notified by email:                           Friday 1 November 2013

NSTSS 2014 will be held from Sunday 12 January to Saturday 18 January 2014 with participants staying on the campus of the Australian National University, Canberra.

For more information please contact Vic Dobos on ceo@asta.edu.au or phone (02) 6282 9377 during office hours.