NYSF STEM Explorer roams across the Adelaide landscape

The first National Youth Science Forum (NYSF) STEM Explorer Program was delivered successfully in July, and what a week it was! Running from 17-21 July in Adelaide, the Program was the first residential STEM camp in Australia for year 7-8 students. Feedback from the students, site visit providers and all involved has been overwhelmingly positive allowing a strong base to build for next year’s program.

The NYSF STEM Explorer Program was delivered as a partnership by the NYSF and South Australian Department of Education and Child Development (DECD).  Championed by the NYSF’s Science Patron, Professor Tanya Monro from the University of South Australia, and supported by the Hon Susan Close MP, Minister for Education and Child Development and also for Higher Education, the STEM Explorer Program was designed to stimulate students’ interest in the study of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

“The STEM Explorer Program is an ideal opportunity for our students to explore STEM on a deeper level and network with other students and experts who share similar interests and levels of passion in these subjects. There’s an identified need for more STEM graduates in the state, and NYSF have worked hard to tailor their specialist pilot program to profile a host of opportunities,” said Ms Close.

Picture: The Hon Susan Close MP speaking to the participants about the value of STEM.

Professor Tanya Monro believes STEM skills are critical to keep Australia moving as an innovative country. “STEM literacy is simply a core capability that Australian employers need. As an education provider, NYSF is proud to offer a new program which aims to attract new students to STEM and equip them with the necessary skills and knowledge to succeed.”

Picture: Professor Tanya Monro, NYSF Science Patron, getting to know the students in the Monro interest group.

A huge thank you to all of our supporters, who generously offered their time and resources to host the students and share with them their own science endeavours, research and passion for STEM:

  • The University of South Australia
  • The University of Adelaide – including the Why Waite program
  • Flinders University
  • the South Australian Museum
  • SciWorld
  • the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI)
  • the South Australian Research and Development Institute (SARDI)
  • the South Australian Aquatic Sciences Centre (SAASC) and the
  • NRM Education – a program of the Adelaide and Mount Lofty Ranges Natural Resources Management Board.
  • Finally, a big thanks to Mylor Adventure Camp for being excellent and supportive hosts!

Most importantly we owe thanks to our funding partners SA DECD and the National Innovation and Science Agenda (NISA).

Read about the NYSF STEM Explorer Program highlights here.

Superstars of STEM – become a voice for female scientists

STEM, women in science, Science

Superstars of STEM is a fantastic opportunity for female NYSF alumni who are interested in developing their communication, presentation and media engagement skills.

Science & Technology Australia is now accepting applications for the inaugural Superstars of STEM. The professional development program aims to smash society’s gender assumptions about scientists and increase the public visibility of women in STEM.

Superstars of STEM will support 30 of the nation’s most dynamic female scientists and technologists to become role models for young women and girls, and work towards equal representation in the media of men and women in STEM.

Science & Technology Australia’s, Chief Executive Officer, Kylie Walker, said the program provides a great career development opportunity for female scientists.

“The opportunities that will come from this program will propel these women’s careers, shaping them to become influencers and leaders in their sector.”

Successful applicants will participate in workshops, networking, mentoring, media and public speaking throughout the program

Women from all STEM disciplines are encouraged to apply, in fields including but not restricted to mathematics, technology, biology, medical research, geology, marine science, microbiology, engineering, physics, astronomy, and more.

Applications close 5pm, 23 May 2017.  To find out more or to apply go to  https://scienceandtechnologyaustralia.org.au/what-we-do/superstars-of-stem/

For further enquiries about the program contact Brodie Steel, Project Officer – Superstars of STEM, Ph 02 6257 2891 or email brodie.steel@sta.org.au

ANU Event – Girls in Engineering and Technology Program (GET Set)

The ANU has the following event on offer to young women interested in engineering and technology with registrations now open.

Girls in Engineering and Technology Program (GET Set) is designed for female students in years 11 and 12, who wish to explore an education and career in engineering or technology.

This year The Australian National University (ANU) is celebrating the 10th GET Set event with a very special program of activities. This free, fun-filled day of non-competitive activities includes design, test and build tasks, lectures, demonstrations and more.

To find out more and register, visit the ANU College of Engineering and Computer Science website.

Date: Wednesday 19 July 2017

Time: 8.30am-4pm

Location: Ian Ross Building 31, The Australian National University

 

An update from the University of Queensland

There is much happening at the University of Queensland – Here is an overview of recent and upcoming events.

UQ St Lucia campus tours
This is a great way to become familiar with the campus. If you take your tour between 6 March – 30 October 2017 you can go into the draw to win a GoPro HERO5 Black, a Red Balloon Voucher and a UQ shirt, at a total value of $800.
To book a guided tour, visit UQ’s Future Students website.

Big Day In
8 June 2017
UQ is hosting the Big Day In on 8 June in the AEB Auditorium at our St Lucia campus. Join us to hear leading speakers from companies such as Microsoft, Adobe, Technology One, WiseTech Global, Tata Consultancy Services plus loads more. Tickets are $10 for students.  Book now.

Scinema

8 June 2017
SCINEMA is a celebration of the power of the moving image to tell stories about the world, how it works, and our place in it. There are hundreds of science stories to be told on screen. Festival screenings will take place across Australia, with the Brisbane screening at the Palace Barracks Cinema at Petrie Terrace. Book your tickets online.

Experience Science 2017
Register as: An individual student – individual students may register to attend on Friday 7 July.
Experience Science is a free event that provides students in years 10 – 12 the opportunity to discover what studying science is like at UQ and how science is applied in industry and everyday life. The event is facilitated by experts from UQ and industry through a series of hands-on, interactive science workshops.

Visit UQ at TSXPO
16 – 17 July 2016
The Tertiary Studies Expo is on again at the RNA Showgrounds. More than 250 representatives from universities and industry will be present and admission is FREE. Drop in and speak to UQ staff about programs, study options and exchange opportunities.


Register now for UQ Earth and Environment Day
21 July 2017 – Register as an individual.
Come and experience the applications and relevance of
geography, planning, earth sciences and environmental management, and find out about career with real world impact. For more information, visit UQ Earth and Environment Day.

 

See UQ up close  –  UQ Open Days
7th August – St Lucia Campus & 21st August – Gatton Campus
UQ Open Day is your chance to get a feel for what it’s like to be a UQ student. At our Open Day you
can speak with staff, take a campus tour and attend information sessions about studying and life at UQ.

AYAF Brisbane
3 – 7 July 2017
The Australian Youth Aerospace Forum (AYAF) is a five-day residential conference on campus at UQ which provides students in years 11 and 12 the opportunity to investigate careers and pathways in the aerospace industry. The forum showcases university and industry opportunities available to students upon completion of secondary school. Applications close Friday 26 May 2017.

 

Spinifex and snakes: women in STEM applauded
Two University of Queensland researchers have won the Queensland Women in STEM competition in recognition of their work paving the way for young women to enter science careers.

 

SPARQ-ed
June-November 2017
The SPARQ-ed Program is a unique initiative of the Translational Research Institute (TRI), the UQ Diamantina Institute (UQDI) and Queensland’s Department of Education and Training (DET) proudly bringing together quality researchers to engage with keen science students and their teachers throughout Queensland.
Spaces are still available in many programs for years 10-12.

 

 

NYSF supports alumnae at Women in STEMM Symposium

Five NYSF alumnae accompanied Madeline Cooper, NYSF’s Manager, Programs, to the Connecting Women in STEMM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Medicine and Maths) symposium held in Melbourne in September. The event aimed to share best practices and policies in academia and industry as well as featuring leading initiatives that aim to foster an environment where more women in STEMM can lead and excel.

Over the two days there were a range of panels and speakers, focusing on topics such as entrepreneurship, how to engage girls in STEMM, and the variety of career paths open to women who are interested in Science.

2016-09-14-13-26-35

Anne-Aelis, Tayla, Karli, Ellen and Charlotte represented the NYSF at the Women in STEMM Symposium in September

“Roughly 60% of those who attend the National Youth Science Forum (NYSF) January Sessions are female – young women who are deeply interested and engaged in STEM,” said Ms Cooper. “Attending the conference gave some great ideas on topics to incorporate into our educational programs so that we can better support these young people in their future careers, as well as an overview of the current ‘state of play’ in STEM research and industry.”

“It’s important for the NYSF to be engaged in this space, and to make connections with people and organisations who are similarly committed to empowering young people, particularly young women, to pursue careers in STEM. Attending events such as the Women in STEMM National Symposium helps us do that.”

The full program can be viewed at https://womeninscienceaust.org/national-symposium/program/.

NYSF 2012 alumna, Anne-Aelis Perfrement, says that she took a lot away from attending the symposium. “I’d like to thank NYSF for sponsoring NYSF alumnae such as myself to attend the event. It was wonderful to make new friends and reconnect with other NYSFers.”

Anne-Aelis added, “The Symposium broke down many of the preconceived notions I held of women in STEMM and their career paths. I now have much more confidence going forward, as I saw with my own eyes that there is a will to help one another and a will to build Australia. As a young woman, this is the strongest message I took from the Symposium.”

Karli Williamson, NSYF 2014 alumna, saw the importance of encouraging more women and girls to engage in STEM related fields during their education and later on in the workforce.

“When so many health related issues are killing thousands of Australians each year, and putting a larger and larger dent in the economy, why wouldn’t we want Australia’s brightest and most innovative young people to study STEM? But instead, we hear that girls are turning away from STEM because they lack the confidence to study subjects that seem challenging, and fall into humanities-based university degrees, and hence, workplaces.”

“(You should) encourage the girls in your life to participate in STEM programs and subjects. If people don’t acknowledge the gender disparity in STEM, call them out. If you know a woman in science, be her champion,” Ms Williamson said.

Further reading: Professor Ian Chubb’s AC MSc DPhil (Oxford) FTSE, FACE, FRSN, take on the gender inequalities that women face in STEM disciplines, featured on the Women in STEMM Australia site.

https://womeninscienceaust.org/2016/09/09/she-did-it/