“It’s worthwhile taking the time to find what it is you like to do”

Alumna Rosie Sackett (2010) recalls her NYSF experience.

“The opportunity to attend the National Youth Science Forum was invaluable. To be surrounded by people from all backgrounds interested in different types of science was an experience I’ll never forget. NYSF students, staff and academics not only opened my eyes to the endless possibilities involved in the world of science, but inspired me to continue further studies in the field.

NYSF students, staff and academics not only opened my eyes to the endless possibilities involved in the world of science, but inspired me to continue further studies in the field.

Rosie Sackett, Alumna 2010

Rosie Sackett, Alumna 2010

Like many NYSFers, it wasn’t all about science. Whilst I knew it was something I wanted to pursue, it became a matter of exploring how I would do so. I enrolled in an Arts/Science degree at UNSW which was a logical choice allowing me to maintain a wide area of interests and at the same time, not limit my options to just science. Having grown up in Wagga Wagga New South Wales, and Arts/Science wasn’t a degree offered at our closest university, so the lure of the big city life led me to make the big move to New College at UNSW in Sydney.

To my surprise and delight, New College attracted many NYSF students so my experience with NYSF didn’t stop at the end of session or at the end of college. I have also enjoyed my continued involvement with the NYSF representing UNSW as a Science Ambassador speaking to students at Partners’ Day.

R - Rosie Sacket

Rosie Sacket (Right) UNSW Science Ambassador

To my surprise and delight, New College attracted many NYSF students so my experience with NYSF didn’t stop at the end of session or at the end of college

If I have learnt anything at university it’s that it’s worthwhile taking the time to find what it is you like to do. I’ve changed my degree to Commerce/Science with the hope of pursuing a career in science business, changed my major three times to end up studying Pathology/International Business and studied on exchange at the University of Edinburgh for a semester.

Whatever it is that you would like to do – whether it be involved in science or not – I think the NYSF teaches you that the possibilities are endless. It doesn’t matter if your path takes you from Wagga Wagga to Sydney to Edinburgh and back to work out what you want to do. But you’ll get there eventually and it will be worth it.”

We will welcome Rosie again in 2016, when she presents to NYSF students about UNSW at Partners’ Day.